Bilateral epididymo-orchitis caused by Brucella melitensis in a Madras red sheep

Bilateral epididymo-orchitis caused by Brucella melitensis in a Madras red sheep

Title: Bilateral epididymo-orchitis caused by Brucella melitensis in a Madras red sheep

Authors: P Preena, UW Wasudeorao, PI Ganesan, BSM Ronald, S Balakrishnan and V Vibin

Source: Ruminant Science (2018)-7(1):145-147.

Cite this reference as: Preena P, Wasudeorao UW, Ganesan PI, Ronald BSM, Balakrishnan S and Vibin V (2018). Bilateral epididymo-orchitis caused by Brucella melitensis in a Madras red sheep. Ruminant Science 7(1):145-147.

Abstract

Present study describes bilateral epididymo-orchitis in a Madras red sheep (Ovis aries) due to Brucella melitensis infection. Clinical, serological, bacteriological and molecular investigation confirmed the presence of infection in the affected ram. A three year old Madras red ram was presented with astasis, fever, asthenia and painful bilateral enlargement of the scrotum. The ram was serologically positive for brucella antibodies by i-ELISA and RBPT. Based on isolation and identification by a battery of biochemical and agglutination tests, Brucella melitensis induced infection was established which was confirmed by Multiplex AMOS PCR assay. The ram was euthanized to prevent the spread of infection. The scrotum was examined, and the gross lesions included multiple abscesses with yellowish creamy pus, conspicuous fibro-granulomatous lesions, dense fibrous adhesions between testicular tunics and atrophy of testicular parenchyma.

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