Pharmacokinetics of lincomycin following intravenous administration in healthy goats

Pharmacokinetics of lincomycin following intravenous administration in healthy goats

Title: Pharmacokinetics of lincomycin following intravenous administration in healthy goats

Authors: Meemansha Sharma, Bhaskar Vemu and VK Dumka

Source: Ruminant Science (2017)-6(2):279-282.

Cite this reference as: Sharma Meemansha, Vemu Bhaskar and Dumka VK (2017). Pharmacokinetics of lincomycin following intravenous administration in healthy goats. Ruminant Science 6(2):279-282.

Abstract

To investigate the pharmacokinetics of Lincomycin after intravenous administration in goats and determine dosage regimen against susceptible micro-organisms. Six healthy female goats were treated with single IV administration of lincomycin @ 10 mg/kg body weight. Blood samples (3-5 ml) were drawn by venepuncture from jugular vein at 0, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, 15, 30 min and 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h and plasma were separated from them. The drug was estimated by HPLC by reverse – phase chromatography. The disposition of lincomycin followed the two-compartment open model. The values of AUC (36.7±3.60 µg.ml-1.h and Vdarea (1.33±0.10 L.kg-1), indicated good antibacterial activity and distribution in various body fluids. The elimination half life and MRT values were short (3.27±0.13 and 3.93±0.25 h, respectively). Based on results, lincomycin is suggested to be repeated intravenously in goats at 12 h interval to maintain T>MIC above 50% for bacteria with MIC value up to 0.6 µg.ml-1.

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